The Order of the Silver Rose

As Chief Frank Davis lay dying in his ICU hospital bed, he was forbidden to have live flowers. His daughter purchased for him a silver plastic rose, to which he said “I’d rather have this silver rose than all of the Purple Hearts in the Pentagon.” He died shortly afterwards of the cancer that was directly linked to his exposure to Agent Orange in Vietnam more than 20 years earlier.

Those whose deaths are linked to their Agent Orange (and the other dioxin-rich defoliants) exposure from their service in Vietnam are ineligible for the Purple Heart. This saddens and angers many families and service members who directly link their combat service exposure to their (pending) death. Mary Elizabeth Marchand channeled her energies after the death of her father (Chief Frank Davis) into creating the non-profit organization the Order of the Silver Rose.

The Order of the Silver Rose has many purposes; first, to honor the nation’s “chemically-wounded” warriors and to educate the public regarding the extent and the dangers of exposures. Secondly, it wants to spread the word to those who were exposed to Agent Orange that simple lab tests done on a regular basis can detect many illnesses linked to the chemical exposure. Early detection helps to extend life or even cure the disease in question. And lastly, it helps to find resources that veterans and families may be eligible for through the VA.

Service members and their family may contact the Order to begin the application process. However, the national organization is on a hiatus due to family illness. Arizona offers a state branch that can be found on Facebook.

“The price of a silver rose is not free. They gave their todays for your tomorrows.”


6 Comments for The Order of the Silver Rose


Posted on Tuesday 25th March, 2014, 2:37pm

I WAS A MEDIC IN VIETNAM IN 1966 AND 1967 WITH 91ST EVAC HOSPITAL OUR AREA WAS SPRAYED SEVERAL TIMES DUE TO THE VILLAGES (5) SURROUNDING OUR BASE. I WAS DIAGNOSISED WITH STAGE 3 PROSTATE CANCER 5 YEARS AGO, NOW RHUMITOID ARTHRITIS, TWO HEART STENTS AND GOD KNOWS WHAT ELSE WILL COME ALONG. ALSO PTSD TREATED FOR 17 YEARS.

Posted on Sunday 17th August, 2014, 12:22pm

I’m the daughter of a Vietnam vet, however, my father served in Thailand. He is currently trying to prove “boots on the ground” as he did stay in Vietnam during transition. During his one-year stint in Thailand, he had to guard the base directly where the herbicides were sprayed in case of Sappher attack. His Agent Orange claim has been denied because somehow the paperwork verifying he was there has been lost. I’m working on a book to expose this monstrosity so I want to interview any/all veterans who’s claim has been denied. These are their stories.

Posted on Monday 15th September, 2014, 12:49pm

I was diagnosed in 2009 with several heart conditions and now on 100% disability.I never thought it would happen to me after seeing many VVA friends(and their children) become strangely ill and/or born with awful deceases,even some mental illnesses.Because of a list that they were NOT on were denied any help or compensation and so having to pay out of pocket or use clinics,including my own son.My point is I hope people would take these more seriously, its ruining a lot of lives,they need help
John…..USN Quang Tri-DONG HA-QUA VIET River 1969

Posted on Friday 16th January, 2015, 12:59pm

My father, HM2 Bruce Jones, was aboard a destroyer on the Saigon River throughout 1967. 17 October 2014 he died of Amyloidosis as a direct result of his exposure. We knew nothing of the disease or its origins until weeks before his death. We are now working through the process to establish a Service Connected Death. Please let me know what I can do to have this Order of the Silver Rose presented to my mother in his memory. He was a great man that left behind three children and 5 grand-children. He died a horrible death to a silent, confusing and embarassing killer. We miss him greatly.

Posted on Friday 6th February, 2015, 6:24pm

Tina, I also served in Thailand in Security along the perimeter. Our perimeter was defoliated in 1969 to provide a 100 yard free fire zone. During this period of time 5 of our bases in Thailand were hit by North Vietnam Sapper teams. During my regular patrols from mid 69 until early 70 I worked in the contaminated area. At 51 I was diagnosed with stage two cancer and in 2010 the VA conceded my cancer was due to herbicide exposure. I don’t see why your father has not been acknowledged by the VA.

Posted on Monday 27th April, 2015, 11:35pm

are you all aware the Donut Dollies who were with us in Viet Nam get no help at all for Agent Orange poisoning ??

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